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How can I create a two dimensional array in JavaScript?


Question

I have been reading online and some places say it isn't possible, some say it is and then give an example and others refute the example, etc.

  1. How do I declare a 2 dimensional array in JavaScript? (assuming it's possible)

  2. How would I access its members? (myArray[0][1] or myArray[0,1]?)

2015/04/20
1
1160
4/20/2015 2:52:52 AM

Accepted Answer

var items = [
  [1, 2],
  [3, 4],
  [5, 6]
];
console.log(items[0][0]); // 1
console.log(items[0][1]); // 2
console.log(items[1][0]); // 3
console.log(items[1][1]); // 4
console.log(items);

2019/08/14
1251
8/14/2019 6:32:25 AM

You simply make each item within the array an array.

var x = new Array(10);

for (var i = 0; i < x.length; i++) {
  x[i] = new Array(3);
}

console.log(x);

2018/08/29

Similar to activa's answer, here's a function to create an n-dimensional array:

function createArray(length) {
    var arr = new Array(length || 0),
        i = length;

    if (arguments.length > 1) {
        var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1);
        while(i--) arr[length-1 - i] = createArray.apply(this, args);
    }

    return arr;
}

createArray();     // [] or new Array()

createArray(2);    // new Array(2)

createArray(3, 2); // [new Array(2),
                   //  new Array(2),
                   //  new Array(2)]
2013/03/31

Javascript only has 1-dimensional arrays, but you can build arrays of arrays, as others pointed out.

The following function can be used to construct a 2-d array of fixed dimensions:

function Create2DArray(rows) {
  var arr = [];

  for (var i=0;i<rows;i++) {
     arr[i] = [];
  }

  return arr;
}

The number of columns is not really important, because it is not required to specify the size of an array before using it.

Then you can just call:

var arr = Create2DArray(100);

arr[50][2] = 5;
arr[70][5] = 7454;
// ...
2009/06/08

How to create an empty two dimensional array (one-line)

Array.from(Array(2), () => new Array(4))

2 and 4 being first and second dimensions respectively.

We are making use of Array.from, which can take an array-like param and an optional mapping for each of the elements.

Array.from(arrayLike[, mapFn[, thisArg]])

var arr = Array.from(Array(2), () => new Array(4));
arr[0][0] = 'foo';
console.info(arr);

The same trick can be used to Create a JavaScript array containing 1...N


Alternatively (but more inefficient 12% with n = 10,000)

Array(2).fill(null).map(() => Array(4))

The performance decrease comes with the fact that we have to have the first dimension values initialized to run .map. Remember that Array will not allocate the positions until you order it to through .fill or direct value assignment.

var arr = Array(2).fill(null).map(() => Array(4));
arr[0][0] = 'foo';
console.info(arr);


Follow up

Here's a method that appears correct, but has issues.

 Array(2).fill(Array(4)); // BAD! Rows are copied by reference

While it does return the apparently desired two dimensional array ([ [ <4 empty items> ], [ <4 empty items> ] ]), there a catch: first dimension arrays have been copied by reference. That means a arr[0][0] = 'foo' would actually change two rows instead of one.

var arr = Array(2).fill(Array(4));
arr[0][0] = 'foo';
console.info(arr);
console.info(arr[0][0], arr[1][0]);

2019/05/12

The easiest way:

var myArray = [[]];
2013/01/22

Source: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/966225
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