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Save plot to image file instead of displaying it using Matplotlib


Question

I am writing a quick-and-dirty script to generate plots on the fly. I am using the code below (from Matplotlib documentation) as a starting point:

from pylab import figure, axes, pie, title, show

# Make a square figure and axes
figure(1, figsize=(6, 6))
ax = axes([0.1, 0.1, 0.8, 0.8])

labels = 'Frogs', 'Hogs', 'Dogs', 'Logs'
fracs = [15, 30, 45, 10]

explode = (0, 0.05, 0, 0)
pie(fracs, explode=explode, labels=labels, autopct='%1.1f%%', shadow=True)
title('Raining Hogs and Dogs', bbox={'facecolor': '0.8', 'pad': 5})

show()  # Actually, don't show, just save to foo.png

I don't want to display the plot on a GUI, instead, I want to save the plot to a file (say foo.png), so that, for example, it can be used in batch scripts. How do I do that?

1
1204
7/27/2018 10:25:57 AM

Accepted Answer

While the question has been answered, I'd like to add some useful tips when using matplotlib.pyplot.savefig. The file format can be specified by the extension:

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt

plt.savefig('foo.png')
plt.savefig('foo.pdf')

Will give a rasterized or vectorized output respectively, both which could be useful. In addition, you'll find that pylab leaves a generous, often undesirable, whitespace around the image. Remove it with:

savefig('foo.png', bbox_inches='tight')
2019/03/18
1501
3/18/2019 5:12:49 PM

As others have said, plt.savefig() or fig1.savefig() is indeed the way to save an image.

However I've found that in certain cases the figure is always shown. (eg. with Spyder having plt.ion(): interactive mode = On.) I work around this by forcing the closing of the figure window in my giant loop with plt.close(figure_object) (see documentation), so I don't have a million open figures during the loop:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
fig, ax = plt.subplots( nrows=1, ncols=1 )  # create figure & 1 axis
ax.plot([0,1,2], [10,20,3])
fig.savefig('path/to/save/image/to.png')   # save the figure to file
plt.close(fig)    # close the figure window

You should be able to re-open the figure later if needed to with fig.show() (didn't test myself).

2019/09/30

The solution is:

pylab.savefig('foo.png')
2014/10/19

Just found this link on the MatPlotLib documentation addressing exactly this issue: http://matplotlib.org/faq/howto_faq.html#generate-images-without-having-a-window-appear

They say that the easiest way to prevent the figure from popping up is to use a non-interactive backend (eg. Agg), via matplotib.use(<backend>), eg:

import matplotlib
matplotlib.use('Agg')
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
plt.plot([1,2,3])
plt.savefig('myfig')

I still personally prefer using plt.close( fig ), since then you have the option to hide certain figures (during a loop), but still display figures for post-loop data processing. It is probably slower than choosing a non-interactive backend though - would be interesting if someone tested that.

UPDATE: for Spyder, you usually can't set the backend in this way (Because Spyder usually loads matplotlib early, preventing you from using matplotlib.use()).

Instead, use plt.switch_backend('Agg'), or Turn off "enable support" in the Spyder prefs and run the matplotlib.use('Agg') command yourself.

From these two hints: one, two

2018/12/09

If you don't like the concept of the "current" figure, do:

import matplotlib.image as mpimg

img = mpimg.imread("src.png")
mpimg.imsave("out.png", img)
2014/10/19

The other answers are correct. However, I sometimes find that I want to open the figure object later. For example, I might want to change the label sizes, add a grid, or do other processing. In a perfect world, I would simply rerun the code generating the plot, and adapt the settings. Alas, the world is not perfect. Therefore, in addition to saving to PDF or PNG, I add:

with open('some_file.pkl', "wb") as fp:
    pickle.dump(fig, fp, protocol=4)

Like this, I can later load the figure object and manipulate the settings as I please.

I also write out the stack with the source-code and locals() dictionary for each function/method in the stack, so that I can later tell exactly what generated the figure.

NB: Be careful, as sometimes this method generates huge files.

2017/02/22

Source: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/9622163
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