Advertisement
Advertisement


How do I copy an object in Java?


Question

Consider the code below:

DummyBean dum = new DummyBean();
dum.setDummy("foo");
System.out.println(dum.getDummy()); // prints 'foo'

DummyBean dumtwo = dum;
System.out.println(dumtwo.getDummy()); // prints 'foo'

dum.setDummy("bar");
System.out.println(dumtwo.getDummy()); // prints 'bar' but it should print 'foo'

So, I want to copy the dum to dumtwo and change dum without affecting the dumtwo. But the code above is not doing that. When I change something in dum, the same change is happening in dumtwo also.

I guess, when I say dumtwo = dum, Java copies the reference only. So, is there any way to create a fresh copy of dum and assign it to dumtwo?

2017/12/23
1
807
12/23/2017 7:15:19 PM

Accepted Answer

Create a copy constructor:

class DummyBean {
  private String dummy;

  public DummyBean(DummyBean another) {
    this.dummy = another.dummy; // you can access  
  }
}

Every object has also a clone method which can be used to copy the object, but don't use it. It's way too easy to create a class and do improper clone method. If you are going to do that, read at least what Joshua Bloch has to say about it in Effective Java.

2009/05/15
625
5/15/2009 2:47:40 PM


In the package import org.apache.commons.lang.SerializationUtils; there is a method:

SerializationUtils.clone(Object);

Example:

this.myObjectCloned = SerializationUtils.clone(this.object);
2013/05/02

Just follow as below:

public class Deletable implements Cloneable{

    private String str;
    public Deletable(){
    }
    public void setStr(String str){
        this.str = str;
    }
    public void display(){
        System.out.println("The String is "+str);
    }
    protected Object clone() throws CloneNotSupportedException {
        return super.clone();
    }
}

and wherever you want to get another object, simple perform cloning. e.g:

Deletable del = new Deletable();
Deletable delTemp = (Deletable ) del.clone(); // this line will return you an independent
                                 // object, the changes made to this object will
                                 // not be reflected to other object
2011/10/20

Why is there no answer for using Reflection API?

private static Object cloneObject(Object obj){
        try{
            Object clone = obj.getClass().newInstance();
            for (Field field : obj.getClass().getDeclaredFields()) {
                field.setAccessible(true);
                field.set(clone, field.get(obj));
            }
            return clone;
        }catch(Exception e){
            return null;
        }
    }

It's really simple.

EDIT: Include child object via recursion

private static Object cloneObject(Object obj){
        try{
            Object clone = obj.getClass().newInstance();
            for (Field field : obj.getClass().getDeclaredFields()) {
                field.setAccessible(true);
                if(field.get(obj) == null || Modifier.isFinal(field.getModifiers())){
                    continue;
                }
                if(field.getType().isPrimitive() || field.getType().equals(String.class)
                        || field.getType().getSuperclass().equals(Number.class)
                        || field.getType().equals(Boolean.class)){
                    field.set(clone, field.get(obj));
                }else{
                    Object childObj = field.get(obj);
                    if(childObj == obj){
                        field.set(clone, clone);
                    }else{
                        field.set(clone, cloneObject(field.get(obj)));
                    }
                }
            }
            return clone;
        }catch(Exception e){
            return null;
        }
    }
2014/08/29

I use Google's JSON library to serialize it then create a new instance of the serialized object. It does deep copy with a few restrictions:

  • there can't be any recursive references

  • it won't copy arrays of disparate types

  • arrays and lists should be typed or it won't find the class to instantiate

  • you may need to encapsulate strings in a class you declare yourself

I also use this class to save user preferences, windows and whatnot to be reloaded at runtime. It is very easy to use and effective.

import com.google.gson.*;

public class SerialUtils {

//___________________________________________________________________________________

public static String serializeObject(Object o) {
    Gson gson = new Gson();
    String serializedObject = gson.toJson(o);
    return serializedObject;
}
//___________________________________________________________________________________

public static Object unserializeObject(String s, Object o){
    Gson gson = new Gson();
    Object object = gson.fromJson(s, o.getClass());
    return object;
}
       //___________________________________________________________________________________
public static Object cloneObject(Object o){
    String s = serializeObject(o);
    Object object = unserializeObject(s,o);
    return object;
}
}
2013/07/09

Yes, you are just making a reference to the object. You can clone the object if it implements Cloneable.

Check out this wiki article about copying objects.

Refer here: Object copying

2016/07/28

Source: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/869033
Licensed under: CC-BY-SA with attribution
Not affiliated with: Stack Overflow
Email: [email protected]