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Question

Given an absolute or relative path (in a Unix-like system), I would like to determine the full path of the target after resolving any intermediate symlinks. Bonus points for also resolving ~username notation at the same time.

If the target is a directory, it might be possible to chdir() into the directory and then call getcwd(), but I really want to do this from a shell script rather than writing a C helper. Unfortunately, shells have a tendency to try to hide the existence of symlinks from the user (this is bash on OS X):

$ ls -ld foo bar
drwxr-xr-x   2 greg  greg  68 Aug 11 22:36 bar
lrwxr-xr-x   1 greg  greg   3 Aug 11 22:36 foo -> bar
$ cd foo
$ pwd
/Users/greg/tmp/foo
$

What I want is a function resolve() such that when executed from the tmp directory in the above example, resolve("foo") == "/Users/greg/tmp/bar".

2009/07/29
1
222
7/29/2009 4:29:32 AM

Accepted Answer

According to the standards, pwd -P should return the path with symlinks resolved.

C function char *getcwd(char *buf, size_t size) from unistd.h should have the same behaviour.

getcwd pwd

2015/10/21
93
10/21/2015 6:41:11 PM


"pwd -P" seems to work if you just want the directory, but if for some reason you want the name of the actual executable I don't think that helps. Here's my solution:

#!/bin/bash

# get the absolute path of the executable
SELF_PATH=$(cd -P -- "$(dirname -- "$0")" && pwd -P) && SELF_PATH=$SELF_PATH/$(basename -- "$0")

# resolve symlinks
while [[ -h $SELF_PATH ]]; do
    # 1) cd to directory of the symlink
    # 2) cd to the directory of where the symlink points
    # 3) get the pwd
    # 4) append the basename
    DIR=$(dirname -- "$SELF_PATH")
    SYM=$(readlink "$SELF_PATH")
    SELF_PATH=$(cd "$DIR" && cd "$(dirname -- "$SYM")" && pwd)/$(basename -- "$SYM")
done
2016/08/18

One of my favorites is realpath foo

realpath - return the canonicalized absolute pathname

realpath  expands  all  symbolic  links  and resolves references to '/./', '/../' and extra '/' characters in the null terminated string named by path and
       stores the canonicalized absolute pathname in the buffer of size PATH_MAX named by resolved_path.  The resulting path will have no symbolic link, '/./' or
       '/../' components.
2008/12/04

readlink -e [filepath]

seems to be exactly what you're asking for - it accepts an arbirary path, resolves all symlinks, and returns the "real" path - and it's "standard *nix" that likely all systems already have

2015/07/09

Another way:

# Gets the real path of a link, following all links
myreadlink() { [ ! -h "$1" ] && echo "$1" || (local link="$(expr "$(command ls -ld -- "$1")" : '.*-> \(.*\)$')"; cd $(dirname $1); myreadlink "$link" | sed "s|^\([^/].*\)\$|$(dirname $1)/\1|"); }

# Returns the absolute path to a command, maybe in $PATH (which) or not. If not found, returns the same
whereis() { echo $1 | sed "s|^\([^/].*/.*\)|$(pwd)/\1|;s|^\([^/]*\)$|$(which -- $1)|;s|^$|$1|"; } 

# Returns the realpath of a called command.
whereis_realpath() { local SCRIPT_PATH=$(whereis $1); myreadlink ${SCRIPT_PATH} | sed "s|^\([^/].*\)\$|$(dirname ${SCRIPT_PATH})/\1|"; } 
2011/09/13

Putting some of the given solutions together, knowing that readlink is available on most systems, but needs different arguments, this works well for me on OSX and Debian. I'm not sure about BSD systems. Maybe the condition needs to be [[ $OSTYPE != darwin* ]] to exclude -f from OSX only.

#!/bin/bash
MY_DIR=$( cd $(dirname $(readlink `[[ $OSTYPE == linux* ]] && echo "-f"` $0)) ; pwd -P)
echo "$MY_DIR"
2016/11/14