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How to measure elapsed time in Python?


Question

What I want is to start counting time somewhere in my code and then get the passed time, to measure the time it took to execute few function. I think I'm using the timeit module wrong, but the docs are just confusing for me.

import timeit

start = timeit.timeit()
print("hello")
end = timeit.timeit()
print(end - start)
2020/06/01
1
1278
6/1/2020 9:24:19 PM


Use timeit.default_timer instead of timeit.timeit. The former provides the best clock available on your platform and version of Python automatically:

from timeit import default_timer as timer

start = timer()
# ...
end = timer()
print(end - start) # Time in seconds, e.g. 5.38091952400282

timeit.default_timer is assigned to time.time() or time.clock() depending on OS. On Python 3.3+ default_timer is time.perf_counter() on all platforms. See Python - time.clock() vs. time.time() - accuracy?

See also:

2020/03/09

Python 3 only:

Since time.clock() is deprecated as of Python 3.3, you will want to use time.perf_counter() for system-wide timing, or time.process_time() for process-wide timing, just the way you used to use time.clock():

import time

t = time.process_time()
#do some stuff
elapsed_time = time.process_time() - t

The new function process_time will not include time elapsed during sleep.

2020/06/20

Given a function you'd like to time,

test.py:

def foo(): 
    # print "hello"   
    return "hello"

the easiest way to use timeit is to call it from the command line:

% python -mtimeit -s'import test' 'test.foo()'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.254 usec per loop

Do not try to use time.time or time.clock (naively) to compare the speed of functions. They can give misleading results.

PS. Do not put print statements in a function you wish to time; otherwise the time measured will depend on the speed of the terminal.

2017/05/23

It's fun to do this with a context-manager that automatically remembers the start time upon entry to a with block, then freezes the end time on block exit. With a little trickery, you can even get a running elapsed-time tally inside the block from the same context-manager function.

The core library doesn't have this (but probably ought to). Once in place, you can do things like:

with elapsed_timer() as elapsed:
    # some lengthy code
    print( "midpoint at %.2f seconds" % elapsed() )  # time so far
    # other lengthy code

print( "all done at %.2f seconds" % elapsed() )

Here's contextmanager code sufficient to do the trick:

from contextlib import contextmanager
from timeit import default_timer

@contextmanager
def elapsed_timer():
    start = default_timer()
    elapser = lambda: default_timer() - start
    yield lambda: elapser()
    end = default_timer()
    elapser = lambda: end-start

And some runnable demo code:

import time

with elapsed_timer() as elapsed:
    time.sleep(1)
    print(elapsed())
    time.sleep(2)
    print(elapsed())
    time.sleep(3)

Note that by design of this function, the return value of elapsed() is frozen on block exit, and further calls return the same duration (of about 6 seconds in this toy example).

2015/11/28

Measuring time in seconds:

from timeit import default_timer as timer
from datetime import timedelta

start = timer()
end = timer()
print(timedelta(seconds=end-start))

Output:

0:00:01.946339
2019/06/22

Source: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/7370801
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