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How do I discard unstaged changes in Git?


Question

How do I discard changes in my working copy that are not in the index?

2019/04/17
1
4933
4/17/2019 4:46:56 AM

Accepted Answer

Another quicker way is:

git stash save --keep-index --include-untracked

You don't need to include --include-untracked if you don't want to be thorough about it.

After that, you can drop that stash with a git stash drop command if you like.

2018/09/11
2749
9/11/2018 12:14:38 AM


It seems like the complete solution is:

git clean -df
git checkout -- .

git clean removes all untracked files (warning: while it won't delete ignored files mentioned directly in .gitignore, it may delete ignored files residing in folders) and git checkout clears all unstaged changes.

2017/03/29

This checks out the current index for the current directory, throwing away all changes in files from the current directory downwards.

git checkout .

or this which checks out all files from the index, overwriting working tree files.

git checkout-index -a -f
2009/06/20

git clean -df

Cleans the working tree by recursively removing files that are not under version control, starting from the current directory.

-d: Remove untracked directories in addition to untracked files

-f: Force (might be not necessary depending on clean.requireForce setting)

Run git help clean to see the manual

2015/05/15

My favorite is

git checkout -p

That lets you selectively revert chunks.

See also:

git add -p
2015/02/23

Since no answer suggests the exact option combination that I use, here it is:

git clean -dxn .  # dry-run to inspect the list of files-to-be-removed
git clean -dxf .  # REMOVE ignored/untracked files (in the current directory)
git checkout -- . # ERASE changes in tracked files (in the current directory)

This is the online help text for the used git clean options:

-d

Remove untracked directories in addition to untracked files. If an untracked directory is managed by a different Git repository, it is not removed by default. Use -f option twice if you really want to remove such a directory.

-x

Don’t use the standard ignore rules read from .gitignore (per directory) and $GIT_DIR/info/exclude, but do still use the ignore rules given with -e options. This allows removing all untracked files, including build products. This can be used (possibly in conjunction with git reset) to create a pristine working directory to test a clean build.

-n

Don’t actually remove anything, just show what would be done.

-f

If the Git configuration variable clean.requireForce is not set to false, Git clean will refuse to delete files or directories unless given -f, -n, or -i. Git will refuse to delete directories within the .git subdirectory or file, unless a second -f is given.

2020/07/14

Source: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/52704
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