Advertisement
Advertisement


How to make an HTTP POST web request


Question

Canonical
How can I make an HTTP request and send some data using the POST method?

I can do a GET request, but I have no idea of how to make a POST request.

2020/04/27
1
1176
4/27/2020 9:01:37 PM

Accepted Answer

There are several ways to perform HTTP GET and POST requests:


Method A: HttpClient (Preferred)

Available in: .NET Framework 4.5+, .NET Standard 1.1+, .NET Core 1.0+ .

It is currently the preferred approach, and is asynchronous and high performance. Use the built-in version in most cases, but for very old platforms there is a NuGet package.

using System.Net.Http;

Setup

It is recommended to instantiate one HttpClient for your application's lifetime and share it unless you have a specific reason not to.

private static readonly HttpClient client = new HttpClient();

See HttpClientFactory for a dependency injection solution.


  • POST

    var values = new Dictionary<string, string>
    {
        { "thing1", "hello" },
        { "thing2", "world" }
    };
    
    var content = new FormUrlEncodedContent(values);
    
    var response = await client.PostAsync("http://www.example.com/recepticle.aspx", content);
    
    var responseString = await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();
    
  • GET

    var responseString = await client.GetStringAsync("http://www.example.com/recepticle.aspx");
    

Method B: Third-Party Libraries

RestSharp

  • POST

     var client = new RestClient("http://example.com");
     // client.Authenticator = new HttpBasicAuthenticator(username, password);
     var request = new RestRequest("resource/{id}");
     request.AddParameter("thing1", "Hello");
     request.AddParameter("thing2", "world");
     request.AddHeader("header", "value");
     request.AddFile("file", path);
     var response = client.Post(request);
     var content = response.Content; // Raw content as string
     var response2 = client.Post<Person>(request);
     var name = response2.Data.Name;
    

Flurl.Http

It is a newer library sporting a fluent API, testing helpers, uses HttpClient under the hood, and is portable. It is available via NuGet.

    using Flurl.Http;

  • POST

    var responseString = await "http://www.example.com/recepticle.aspx"
        .PostUrlEncodedAsync(new { thing1 = "hello", thing2 = "world" })
        .ReceiveString();
    
  • GET

    var responseString = await "http://www.example.com/recepticle.aspx"
        .GetStringAsync();
    

Available in: .NET Framework 1.1+, .NET Standard 2.0+, .NET Core 1.0+. In .NET Core, it is mostly for compatibility -- it wraps HttpClient, is less performant, and won't get new features.

using System.Net;
using System.Text;  // For class Encoding
using System.IO;    // For StreamReader

  • POST

    var request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create("http://www.example.com/recepticle.aspx");
    
    var postData = "thing1=" + Uri.EscapeDataString("hello");
        postData += "&thing2=" + Uri.EscapeDataString("world");
    var data = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(postData);
    
    request.Method = "POST";
    request.ContentType = "application/x-www-form-urlencoded";
    request.ContentLength = data.Length;
    
    using (var stream = request.GetRequestStream())
    {
        stream.Write(data, 0, data.Length);
    }
    
    var response = (HttpWebResponse)request.GetResponse();
    
    var responseString = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream()).ReadToEnd();
    
  • GET

    var request = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create("http://www.example.com/recepticle.aspx");
    
    var response = (HttpWebResponse)request.GetResponse();
    
    var responseString = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream()).ReadToEnd();
    

This is a wrapper around HttpWebRequest. Compare with HttpClient.

Available in: .NET Framework 1.1+, NET Standard 2.0+, .NET Core 2.0+

using System.Net;
using System.Collections.Specialized;

  • POST

    using (var client = new WebClient())
    {
        var values = new NameValueCollection();
        values["thing1"] = "hello";
        values["thing2"] = "world";
    
        var response = client.UploadValues("http://www.example.com/recepticle.aspx", values);
    
        var responseString = Encoding.Default.GetString(response);
    }
    
  • GET

    using (var client = new WebClient())
    {
        var responseString = client.DownloadString("http://www.example.com/recepticle.aspx");
    }
    
2020/04/27
2234
4/27/2020 9:09:53 PM

Simple GET request

using System.Net;

...

using (var wb = new WebClient())
{
    var response = wb.DownloadString(url);
}

Simple POST request

using System.Net;
using System.Collections.Specialized;

...

using (var wb = new WebClient())
{
    var data = new NameValueCollection();
    data["username"] = "myUser";
    data["password"] = "myPassword";

    var response = wb.UploadValues(url, "POST", data);
    string responseInString = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(response);
}
2018/01/06

MSDN has a sample.

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Net;
using System.Text;

namespace Examples.System.Net
{
    public class WebRequestPostExample
    {
        public static void Main()
        {
            // Create a request using a URL that can receive a post. 
            WebRequest request = WebRequest.Create("http://www.contoso.com/PostAccepter.aspx");
            // Set the Method property of the request to POST.
            request.Method = "POST";
            // Create POST data and convert it to a byte array.
            string postData = "This is a test that posts this string to a Web server.";
            byte[] byteArray = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(postData);
            // Set the ContentType property of the WebRequest.
            request.ContentType = "application/x-www-form-urlencoded";
            // Set the ContentLength property of the WebRequest.
            request.ContentLength = byteArray.Length;
            // Get the request stream.
            Stream dataStream = request.GetRequestStream();
            // Write the data to the request stream.
            dataStream.Write(byteArray, 0, byteArray.Length);
            // Close the Stream object.
            dataStream.Close();
            // Get the response.
            WebResponse response = request.GetResponse();
            // Display the status.
            Console.WriteLine(((HttpWebResponse)response).StatusDescription);
            // Get the stream containing content returned by the server.
            dataStream = response.GetResponseStream();
            // Open the stream using a StreamReader for easy access.
            StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(dataStream);
            // Read the content.
            string responseFromServer = reader.ReadToEnd();
            // Display the content.
            Console.WriteLine(responseFromServer);
            // Clean up the streams.
            reader.Close();
            dataStream.Close();
            response.Close();
        }
    }
}
2017/07/31

This is a complete working example of sending/receiving data in JSON format, I used Visual Studio 2013 Express Edition:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Data;
using System.Data.OleDb;
using System.IO;
using System.Linq;
using System.Net.Http;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Web.Script.Serialization;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Customer
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public string Address { get; set; }
        public string Phone { get; set; }
    }

    public class Program
    {
        private static readonly HttpClient _Client = new HttpClient();
        private static JavaScriptSerializer _Serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Run().Wait();
        }

        static async Task Run()
        {
            string url = "http://www.example.com/api/Customer";
            Customer cust = new Customer() { Name = "Example Customer", Address = "Some example address", Phone = "Some phone number" };
            var json = _Serializer.Serialize(cust);
            var response = await Request(HttpMethod.Post, url, json, new Dictionary<string, string>());
            string responseText = await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();

            List<YourCustomClassModel> serializedResult = _Serializer.Deserialize<List<YourCustomClassModel>>(responseText);

            Console.WriteLine(responseText);
            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Makes an async HTTP Request
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="pMethod">Those methods you know: GET, POST, HEAD, etc...</param>
        /// <param name="pUrl">Very predictable...</param>
        /// <param name="pJsonContent">String data to POST on the server</param>
        /// <param name="pHeaders">If you use some kind of Authorization you should use this</param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        static async Task<HttpResponseMessage> Request(HttpMethod pMethod, string pUrl, string pJsonContent, Dictionary<string, string> pHeaders)
        {
            var httpRequestMessage = new HttpRequestMessage();
            httpRequestMessage.Method = pMethod;
            httpRequestMessage.RequestUri = new Uri(pUrl);
            foreach (var head in pHeaders)
            {
                httpRequestMessage.Headers.Add(head.Key, head.Value);
            }
            switch (pMethod.Method)
            {
                case "POST":
                    HttpContent httpContent = new StringContent(pJsonContent, Encoding.UTF8, "application/json");
                    httpRequestMessage.Content = httpContent;
                    break;

            }

            return await _Client.SendAsync(httpRequestMessage);
        }
    }
}
2020/04/27

There are some really good answers on here. Let me post a different way to set your headers with the WebClient(). I will also show you how to set an API key.

        var client = new WebClient();
        string credentials = Convert.ToBase64String(Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(userName + ":" + passWord));
        client.Headers[HttpRequestHeader.Authorization] = $"Basic {credentials}";
        //If you have your data stored in an object serialize it into json to pass to the webclient with Newtonsoft's JsonConvert
        var encodedJson = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(newAccount);

        client.Headers.Add($"x-api-key:{ApiKey}");
        client.Headers.Add("Content-Type:application/json");
        try
        {
            var response = client.UploadString($"{apiurl}", encodedJson);
            //if you have a model to deserialize the json into Newtonsoft will help bind the data to the model, this is an extremely useful trick for GET calls when you have a lot of data, you can strongly type a model and dump it into an instance of that class.
            Response response1 = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Response>(response);
2018/10/10

This solution uses nothing but standard .NET calls.

Tested:

  • In use in an enterprise WPF application. Uses async/await to avoid blocking the UI.
  • Compatible with .NET 4.5+.
  • Tested with no parameters (requires a "GET" behind the scenes).
  • Tested with parameters (requires a "POST" behind the scenes).
  • Tested with a standard web page such as Google.
  • Tested with an internal Java-based webservice.

Reference:

// Add a Reference to the assembly System.Web

Code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Collections.Specialized;
using System.Net;
using System.Net.Http;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Web;

private async Task<WebResponse> CallUri(string url, TimeSpan timeout)
{
    var uri = new Uri(url);
    NameValueCollection rawParameters = HttpUtility.ParseQueryString(uri.Query);
    var parameters = new Dictionary<string, string>();
    foreach (string p in rawParameters.Keys)
    {
        parameters[p] = rawParameters[p];
    }

    var client = new HttpClient { Timeout = timeout };
    HttpResponseMessage response;
    if (parameters.Count == 0)
    {
        response = await client.GetAsync(url);
    }
    else
    {
        var content = new FormUrlEncodedContent(parameters);
        string urlMinusParameters = uri.OriginalString.Split('?')[0]; // Parameters always follow the '?' symbol.
        response = await client.PostAsync(urlMinusParameters, content);
    }
    var responseString = await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();

    return new WebResponse(response.StatusCode, responseString);
}

private class WebResponse
{
    public WebResponse(HttpStatusCode httpStatusCode, string response)
    {
        this.HttpStatusCode = httpStatusCode;
        this.Response = response;
    }
    public HttpStatusCode HttpStatusCode { get; }
    public string Response { get; }
}

To call with no parameters (uses a "GET" behind the scenes):

 var timeout = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(300);
 WebResponse response = await this.CallUri("http://www.google.com/", timeout);
 if (response.HttpStatusCode == HttpStatusCode.OK)
 {
     Console.Write(response.Response); // Print HTML.
 }

To call with parameters (uses a "POST" behind the scenes):

 var timeout = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(300);
 WebResponse response = await this.CallUri("http://example.com/path/to/page?name=ferret&color=purple", timeout);
 if (response.HttpStatusCode == HttpStatusCode.OK)
 {
     Console.Write(response.Response); // Print HTML.
 }
2019/04/03

Source: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/4015324
Licensed under: CC-BY-SA with attribution
Not affiliated with: Stack Overflow
Email: [email protected]