Advertisement
Advertisement


How to detect the OS from a Bash script?


Question

I would like to keep my .bashrc and .bash_login files in version control so that I can use them between all the computers I use. The problem is I have some OS specific aliases so I was looking for a way to determine if the script is running on Mac OS X, Linux or Cygwin.

What is the proper way to detect the operating system in a Bash script?

2018/03/04
1
561
3/4/2018 5:32:41 PM

Accepted Answer

I think the following should work. I'm not sure about win32 though.

if [[ "$OSTYPE" == "linux-gnu"* ]]; then
        # ...
elif [[ "$OSTYPE" == "darwin"* ]]; then
        # Mac OSX
elif [[ "$OSTYPE" == "cygwin" ]]; then
        # POSIX compatibility layer and Linux environment emulation for Windows
elif [[ "$OSTYPE" == "msys" ]]; then
        # Lightweight shell and GNU utilities compiled for Windows (part of MinGW)
elif [[ "$OSTYPE" == "win32" ]]; then
        # I'm not sure this can happen.
elif [[ "$OSTYPE" == "freebsd"* ]]; then
        # ...
else
        # Unknown.
fi
2020/05/05
566
5/5/2020 12:08:57 PM


The bash manpage says that the variable OSTYPE stores the name of the operation system:

OSTYPE Automatically set to a string that describes the operating system on which bash is executing. The default is system- dependent.

It is set to linux-gnu here.


$OSTYPE

You can simply use pre-defined $OSTYPE variable e.g.:

case "$OSTYPE" in
  solaris*) echo "SOLARIS" ;;
  darwin*)  echo "OSX" ;; 
  linux*)   echo "LINUX" ;;
  bsd*)     echo "BSD" ;;
  msys*)    echo "WINDOWS" ;;
  *)        echo "unknown: $OSTYPE" ;;
esac

However it's not recognized by the older shells (such as Bourne shell).


uname

Another method is to detect platform based on uname command.

See the following script (ready to include in .bashrc):

# Detect the platform (similar to $OSTYPE)
OS="`uname`"
case $OS in
  'Linux')
    OS='Linux'
    alias ls='ls --color=auto'
    ;;
  'FreeBSD')
    OS='FreeBSD'
    alias ls='ls -G'
    ;;
  'WindowsNT')
    OS='Windows'
    ;;
  'Darwin') 
    OS='Mac'
    ;;
  'SunOS')
    OS='Solaris'
    ;;
  'AIX') ;;
  *) ;;
esac

You can find some practical example in my .bashrc.


Here is similar version used on Travis CI:

case $(uname | tr '[:upper:]' '[:lower:]') in
  linux*)
    export TRAVIS_OS_NAME=linux
    ;;
  darwin*)
    export TRAVIS_OS_NAME=osx
    ;;
  msys*)
    export TRAVIS_OS_NAME=windows
    ;;
  *)
    export TRAVIS_OS_NAME=notset
    ;;
esac
2019/05/09

Detecting operating system and CPU type is not so easy to do portably. I have a sh script of about 100 lines that works across a very wide variety of Unix platforms: any system I have used since 1988.

The key elements are

  • uname -p is processor type but is usually unknown on modern Unix platforms.

  • uname -m will give the "machine hardware name" on some Unix systems.

  • /bin/arch, if it exists, will usually give the type of processor.

  • uname with no arguments will name the operating system.

Eventually you will have to think about the distinctions between platforms and how fine you want to make them. For example, just to keep things simple, I treat i386 through i686 , any "Pentium*" and any "AMD*Athlon*" all as x86.

My ~/.profile runs an a script at startup which sets one variable to a string indicating the combination of CPU and operating system. I have platform-specific bin, man, lib, and include directories that get set up based on that. Then I set a boatload of environment variables. So for example, a shell script to reformat mail can call, e.g., $LIB/mailfmt which is a platform-specific executable binary.

If you want to cut corners, uname -m and plain uname will tell you what you want to know on many platforms. Add other stuff when you need it. (And use case, not nested if!)

2018/04/26

I recommend to use this complete bash code

lowercase(){
    echo "$1" | sed "y/ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ/abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz/"
}

OS=`lowercase \`uname\``
KERNEL=`uname -r`
MACH=`uname -m`

if [ "{$OS}" == "windowsnt" ]; then
    OS=windows
elif [ "{$OS}" == "darwin" ]; then
    OS=mac
else
    OS=`uname`
    if [ "${OS}" = "SunOS" ] ; then
        OS=Solaris
        ARCH=`uname -p`
        OSSTR="${OS} ${REV}(${ARCH} `uname -v`)"
    elif [ "${OS}" = "AIX" ] ; then
        OSSTR="${OS} `oslevel` (`oslevel -r`)"
    elif [ "${OS}" = "Linux" ] ; then
        if [ -f /etc/redhat-release ] ; then
            DistroBasedOn='RedHat'
            DIST=`cat /etc/redhat-release |sed s/\ release.*//`
            PSUEDONAME=`cat /etc/redhat-release | sed s/.*\(// | sed s/\)//`
            REV=`cat /etc/redhat-release | sed s/.*release\ // | sed s/\ .*//`
        elif [ -f /etc/SuSE-release ] ; then
            DistroBasedOn='SuSe'
            PSUEDONAME=`cat /etc/SuSE-release | tr "\n" ' '| sed s/VERSION.*//`
            REV=`cat /etc/SuSE-release | tr "\n" ' ' | sed s/.*=\ //`
        elif [ -f /etc/mandrake-release ] ; then
            DistroBasedOn='Mandrake'
            PSUEDONAME=`cat /etc/mandrake-release | sed s/.*\(// | sed s/\)//`
            REV=`cat /etc/mandrake-release | sed s/.*release\ // | sed s/\ .*//`
        elif [ -f /etc/debian_version ] ; then
            DistroBasedOn='Debian'
            DIST=`cat /etc/lsb-release | grep '^DISTRIB_ID' | awk -F=  '{ print $2 }'`
            PSUEDONAME=`cat /etc/lsb-release | grep '^DISTRIB_CODENAME' | awk -F=  '{ print $2 }'`
            REV=`cat /etc/lsb-release | grep '^DISTRIB_RELEASE' | awk -F=  '{ print $2 }'`
        fi
        if [ -f /etc/UnitedLinux-release ] ; then
            DIST="${DIST}[`cat /etc/UnitedLinux-release | tr "\n" ' ' | sed s/VERSION.*//`]"
        fi
        OS=`lowercase $OS`
        DistroBasedOn=`lowercase $DistroBasedOn`
        readonly OS
        readonly DIST
        readonly DistroBasedOn
        readonly PSUEDONAME
        readonly REV
        readonly KERNEL
        readonly MACH
    fi

fi
echo $OS
echo $KERNEL
echo $MACH

more examples examples here: https://github.com/coto/server-easy-install/blob/master/lib/core.sh

2020/07/16

I would suggest avoiding some of these answers. Don't forget that you can choose other forms of string comparison, which would clear up most of the variations, or ugly code offered.

One such solution would be a simple check, such as:

if [[ "$OSTYPE" =~ ^darwin ]]; then

Which has the added benefit of matching any version of Darwin, despite it's version suffix. This also works for any variations of Linux one may expect.

You can see some additional examples within my dotfiles here

2012/05/03

Source: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/394230
Licensed under: CC-BY-SA with attribution
Not affiliated with: Stack Overflow
Email: [email protected]