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Python error "ImportError: No module named"


Question

Python is installed in a local directory.

My directory tree looks like this:

(local directory)/site-packages/toolkit/interface.py

My code is in here:

(local directory)/site-packages/toolkit/examples/mountain.py

To run the example, I write python mountain.py, and in the code I have:

from toolkit.interface import interface

And I get the error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "mountain.py", line 28, in ?
    from toolkit.interface import interface
ImportError: No module named toolkit.interface

I have already checked sys.path and there I have the directory /site-packages. Also, I have the file __init__.py.bin in the toolkit folder to indicate to Python that this is a package. I also have a __init__.py.bin in the examples directory.

I do not know why Python cannot find the file when it is in sys.path. Any ideas? Can it be a permissions problem? Do I need some execution permission?

2017/08/15
1
468
8/15/2017 7:50:09 PM

Accepted Answer

Based on your comments to orip's post, I guess this is what happened:

  1. You edited __init__.py on windows.
  2. The windows editor added something non-printing, perhaps a carriage-return (end-of-line in Windows is CR/LF; in unix it is LF only), or perhaps a CTRL-Z (windows end-of-file).
  3. You used WinSCP to copy the file to your unix box.
  4. WinSCP thought: "This has something that's not basic text; I'll put a .bin extension to indicate binary data."
  5. The missing __init__.py (now called __init__.py.bin) means python doesn't understand toolkit as a package.
  6. You create __init__.py in the appropriate directory and everything works... ?
2008/12/04
269
12/4/2008 12:17:40 AM

Does

(local directory)/site-packages/toolkit

have a __init__.py?

To make import walk through your directories every directory must have a __init__.py file.

2008/12/03

I ran into something very similar when I did this exercise in LPTHW; I could never get Python to recognise that I had files in the directory I was calling from. But I was able to get it to work in the end. What I did, and what I recommend, is to try this:

(NOTE: From your initial post, I am assuming you are using an *NIX-based machine and are running things from the command line, so this advice is tailored to that. Since I run Ubuntu, this is what I did)

1) Change directory (cd) to the directory above the directory where your files are. In this case, you're trying to run the mountain.py file, and trying to call the toolkit.interface.py module, which are in separate directories. In this case, you would go to the directory that contains paths to both those files (or in other words, the closest directory that the paths of both those files share). Which in this case is the toolkit directory.

2) When you are in the tookit directory, enter this line of code on your command line:

export PYTHONPATH=.

This sets your PYTHONPATH to ".", which basically means that your PYTHONPATH will now look for any called files within the directory you are currently in, (and more to the point, in the sub-directory branches of the directory you are in. So it doesn't just look in your current directory, but in all the directories that are in your current directory).

3) After you've set your PYTHONPATH in the step above, run your module from your current directory (the toolkit directory). Python should now find and load the modules you specified.

Hope this helps. I was quite frustrated with this myself.

2014/04/22

On *nix, also make sure that PYTHONPATH is configured correctly, especially that it has this format:

 .:/usr/local/lib/python

(Mind the .: at the beginning, so that it can search on the current directory, too.)

It may also be in other locations, depending on the version:

 .:/usr/lib/python
 .:/usr/lib/python2.6
 .:/usr/lib/python2.7 and etc.
2017/01/19

I solved my own problem, and I will write a summary of the things that were wrong and the solution:

The file needs to be called exactly __init__.py. If the extension is different such as in my case .py.bin then Python cannot move through the directories and then it cannot find the modules. To edit the files you need to use a Linux editor, such as vi or nano. If you use a Windows editor this will write some hidden characters.

Another problem that was affecting it was that I had another Python version installed by the root, so if someone is working with a local installation of python, be sure that the Python installation that is running the programs is the local Python. To check this, just do which python, and see if the executable is the one that is in your local directory. If not, change the path, but be sure that the local Python directory is before than the other Python.

2017/01/19

an easy solution is to install the module using python -m pip install <library-name> instead of pip install <library-name> you may use sudo in case of admin restrictions

2017/09/18

Source: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/338768
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