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How to print colored text in Python?


Question

How can I output colored text to the terminal in Python?

2020/06/25
1
2218
6/25/2020 3:38:40 AM


I'm surprised no one has mentioned the Python termcolor module. Usage is pretty simple:

from termcolor import colored

print colored('hello', 'red'), colored('world', 'green')

Or in Python 3:

print(colored('hello', 'red'), colored('world', 'green'))

It may not be sophisticated enough, however, for game programming and the "colored blocks" that you want to do...

2018/08/30

The answer is Colorama for all cross-platform coloring in Python.

A Python 3.6 example screenshot: example screenshot

2018/01/19

Print a string that starts a color/style, then the string, then end the color/style change with '\x1b[0m':

print('\x1b[6;30;42m' + 'Success!' + '\x1b[0m')

Success with green background example

Get a table of format options for shell text with following code:

def print_format_table():
    """
    prints table of formatted text format options
    """
    for style in range(8):
        for fg in range(30,38):
            s1 = ''
            for bg in range(40,48):
                format = ';'.join([str(style), str(fg), str(bg)])
                s1 += '\x1b[%sm %s \x1b[0m' % (format, format)
            print(s1)
        print('\n')

print_format_table()

Light-on-dark example (complete)

enter image description here

Dark-on-light example (partial)

top part of output

2020/06/20

Define a string that starts a color and a string that ends the color, then print your text with the start string at the front and the end string at the end.

CRED = '\033[91m'
CEND = '\033[0m'
print(CRED + "Error, does not compute!" + CEND)

This produces the following in bash, in urxvt with a Zenburn-style color scheme:

output colors

Through experimentation, we can get more colors:

color matrix

Note: \33[5m and \33[6m are blinking.

This way we can create a full color collection:

CEND      = '\33[0m'
CBOLD     = '\33[1m'
CITALIC   = '\33[3m'
CURL      = '\33[4m'
CBLINK    = '\33[5m'
CBLINK2   = '\33[6m'
CSELECTED = '\33[7m'

CBLACK  = '\33[30m'
CRED    = '\33[31m'
CGREEN  = '\33[32m'
CYELLOW = '\33[33m'
CBLUE   = '\33[34m'
CVIOLET = '\33[35m'
CBEIGE  = '\33[36m'
CWHITE  = '\33[37m'

CBLACKBG  = '\33[40m'
CREDBG    = '\33[41m'
CGREENBG  = '\33[42m'
CYELLOWBG = '\33[43m'
CBLUEBG   = '\33[44m'
CVIOLETBG = '\33[45m'
CBEIGEBG  = '\33[46m'
CWHITEBG  = '\33[47m'

CGREY    = '\33[90m'
CRED2    = '\33[91m'
CGREEN2  = '\33[92m'
CYELLOW2 = '\33[93m'
CBLUE2   = '\33[94m'
CVIOLET2 = '\33[95m'
CBEIGE2  = '\33[96m'
CWHITE2  = '\33[97m'

CGREYBG    = '\33[100m'
CREDBG2    = '\33[101m'
CGREENBG2  = '\33[102m'
CYELLOWBG2 = '\33[103m'
CBLUEBG2   = '\33[104m'
CVIOLETBG2 = '\33[105m'
CBEIGEBG2  = '\33[106m'
CWHITEBG2  = '\33[107m'

Here is the code to generate the test:

x = 0
for i in range(24):
  colors = ""
  for j in range(5):
    code = str(x+j)
    colors = colors + "\33[" + code + "m\\33[" + code + "m\033[0m "
  print(colors)
  x=x+5
2019/06/21

You want to learn about ANSI escape sequences. Here's a brief example:

CSI="\x1B["
print(CSI+"31;40m" + "Colored Text" + CSI + "0m")

For more info see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ANSI_escape_code

For a block character, try a unicode character like \u2588:

print(u"\u2588")

Putting it all together:

print(CSI+"31;40m" + u"\u2588" + CSI + "0m")
2019/07/11

Source: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/287871
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