Advertisement
Advertisement


How to display a Yes/No dialog box on Android?


Question

Yes, I know there's AlertDialog.Builder, but I'm shocked to know how difficult (well, at least not programmer-friendly) to display a dialog in Android.

I used to be a .NET developer, and I'm wondering is there any Android-equivalent of the following?

if (MessageBox.Show("Sure?", "", MessageBoxButtons.YesNo) == DialogResult.Yes){
    // Do something...
}
2016/05/17
1
363
5/17/2016 9:24:13 PM

Accepted Answer

AlertDialog.Builder really isn't that hard to use. It's a bit intimidating at first for sure, but once you've used it a bit it's both simple and powerful. I know you've said you know how to use it, but here's just a simple example anyway:

DialogInterface.OnClickListener dialogClickListener = new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
    @Override
    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
        switch (which){
        case DialogInterface.BUTTON_POSITIVE:
            //Yes button clicked
            break;

        case DialogInterface.BUTTON_NEGATIVE:
            //No button clicked
            break;
        }
    }
};

AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(context);
builder.setMessage("Are you sure?").setPositiveButton("Yes", dialogClickListener)
    .setNegativeButton("No", dialogClickListener).show();

You can also reuse that DialogInterface.OnClickListener if you have other yes/no boxes that should do the same thing.

If you're creating the Dialog from within a View.OnClickListener, you can use view.getContext() to get the Context. Alternatively you can use yourFragmentName.getActivity().

2015/01/05
753
1/5/2015 5:59:09 PM

Try this:

AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(this);

builder.setTitle("Confirm");
builder.setMessage("Are you sure?");

builder.setPositiveButton("YES", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
        // Do nothing but close the dialog

        dialog.dismiss();
    }
});

builder.setNegativeButton("NO", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

    @Override
    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {

        // Do nothing
        dialog.dismiss();
    }
});

AlertDialog alert = builder.create();
alert.show();
2016/10/06

Steve H's answer is spot on, but here's a bit more information: the reason that dialogs work the way they do is because dialogs in Android are asynchronous (execution does not stop when the dialog is displayed). Because of this, you have to use a callback to handle the user's selection.

Check out this question for a longer discussion between the differences in Android and .NET (as it relates to dialogs): Dialogs / AlertDialogs: How to "block execution" while dialog is up (.NET-style)

2017/05/23

This is working for me:

AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(getApplicationContext());

    builder.setTitle("Confirm");
    builder.setMessage("Are you sure?");

    builder.setPositiveButton("YES", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {

            // Do nothing, but close the dialog
            dialog.dismiss();
        }
    });

    builder.setNegativeButton("NO", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

        @Override
        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {

            // Do nothing
            dialog.dismiss();
        }
    });

    AlertDialog alert = builder.create();
    alert.show();
2016/05/17

Asking a Person whether he wants to call or not Dialog..

import android.app.Activity;
import android.app.AlertDialog;
import android.content.DialogInterface;
import android.content.Intent;
import android.net.Uri;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.view.View;
import android.view.View.OnClickListener;
import android.widget.ImageView;
import android.widget.Toast;

public class Firstclass extends Activity {

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {    
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);    
        setContentView(R.layout.first);

        ImageView imageViewCall = (ImageView) findViewById(R.id.ring_mig);

        imageViewCall.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(View v){
                try{
                    showDialog("0728570527");
                } catch (Exception e){
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }                   
            }    
        });    
    }

    public void showDialog(final String phone) throws Exception {
        AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(Firstclass.this);

        builder.setMessage("Ring: " + phone);       

        builder.setPositiveButton("Ring", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener(){
            @Override
            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which){

                Intent callIntent = new Intent(Intent.ACTION_DIAL);// (Intent.ACTION_CALL);                 
                callIntent.setData(Uri.parse("tel:" + phone));
                startActivity(callIntent);

                dialog.dismiss();
            }
        });

        builder.setNegativeButton("Abort", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener(){   
            @Override
            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which){
                dialog.dismiss();
            }
        });         
        builder.show();
    }    
}
2019/03/08

Steves answer is correct though outdated with fragments. Here is an example with FragmentDialog.

The class:

public class SomeDialog extends DialogFragment {

    @Override
    public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        return new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity())
            .setTitle("Title")
            .setMessage("Sure you wanna do this!")
            .setNegativeButton(android.R.string.no, new OnClickListener() {
                @Override
                public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                    // do nothing (will close dialog)
                }
            })
            .setPositiveButton(android.R.string.yes,  new OnClickListener() {
                @Override
                public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                    // do something
                }
            })
            .create();
    }
}

To start dialog:

            FragmentTransaction ft = getSupportFragmentManager().beginTransaction();
            // Create and show the dialog.
            SomeDialog newFragment = new SomeDialog ();
            newFragment.show(ft, "dialog");

You could also let the class implement onClickListener and use that instead of embedded listeners.

2013/04/23

Source: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/2478517
Licensed under: CC-BY-SA with attribution
Not affiliated with: Stack Overflow
Email: [email protected]