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The located assembly's manifest definition does not match the assembly reference


Question

I am trying to run some unit tests in a C# Windows Forms application (Visual Studio 2005), and I get the following error:

System.IO.FileLoadException: Could not load file or assembly 'Utility, Version=1.2.0.200, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=764d581291d764f7' or one of its dependencies. The located assembly's manifest definition does not match the assembly reference. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x80131040)**

at x.Foo.FooGO()

at x.Foo.Foo2(String groupName_) in Foo.cs:line 123

at x.Foo.UnitTests.FooTests.TestFoo() in FooTests.cs:line 98**

System.IO.FileLoadException: Could not load file or assembly 'Utility, Version=1.2.0.203, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=764d581291d764f7' or one of its dependencies. The located assembly's manifest definition does not match the assembly reference. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x80131040)

I look in my references, and I only have a reference to Utility version 1.2.0.203 (the other one is old).

Any suggestions on how I figure out what is trying to reference this old version of this DLL file?

Besides, I don't think I even have this old assembly on my hard drive. Is there any tool to search for this old versioned assembly?

2020/06/20
1
766
6/20/2020 9:12:55 AM

Accepted Answer

The .NET Assembly loader:

  • is unable to find 1.2.0.203
  • but did find a 1.2.0.200

This assembly does not match what was requested and therefore you get this error.

In simple words, it can't find the assembly that was referenced. Make sure it can find the right assembly by putting it in the GAC or in the application path. Also see https://docs.microsoft.com/archive/blogs/junfeng/the-located-assemblys-manifest-definition-with-name-xxx-dll-does-not-match-the-assembly-reference.

2020/02/22
467
2/22/2020 1:13:00 AM

You can do a couple of things to troubleshoot this issue. First, use Windows file search to search your hard drive for your assembly (.dll). Once you have a list of results, do View->Choose Details... and then check "File Version". This will display the version number in the list of results, so you can see where the old version might be coming from.

Also, like Lars said, check your GAC to see what version is listed there. This Microsoft article states that assemblies found in the GAC are not copied locally during a build, so you might need to remove the old version before doing a rebuild all. (See my answer to this question for notes on creating a batch file to do this for you)

If you still can't figure out where the old version is coming from, you can use the fuslogvw.exe application that ships with Visual Studio to get more information about the binding failures. Microsoft has information about this tool here. Note that you'll have to enable logging by setting the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Fusion\EnableLog registry key to 1.

2017/05/23

I just ran into this problem myself, and I found that the issue was something different than what the others have run into.

I had two DLLs that my main project was referencing: CompanyClasses.dll and CompanyControls.dll. I was getting a run-time error saying:

Could not load file or assembly 'CompanyClasses, Version=1.4.1.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=045746ba8544160c' or one of its dependencies. The located assembly's manifest definition does not match the assembly reference

Trouble was, I didn't have any CompanyClasses.dll files on my system with a version number of 1.4.1. None in the GAC, none in the app folders...none anywhere. I searched my entire hard drive. All the CompanyClasses.dll files I had were 1.4.2.

The real problem, I found, was that CompanyControls.dll referenced version 1.4.1 of CompanyClasses.dll. I just recompiled CompanyControls.dll (after having it reference CompanyClasses.dll 1.4.2) and this error went away for me.

2009/11/17

The following redirects any assembly version to version 3.1.0.0. We have a script that will always update this reference in the App.config so we never have to deal with this issue again.

Through reflection you can get the assembly publicKeyToken and generate this block from the .dll file itself.

<assemblyBinding xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1">
 <dependentAssembly>
    <assemblyIdentity name="Castle.Core" publicKeyToken="407dd0808d44fbdc" culture="neutral" />
    <bindingRedirect oldVersion="0.0.0.0-65535.65535.65535.65535" newVersion="3.1.0.0" />
  </dependentAssembly>
</assemblyBinding>

Note that without an XML namespace attribute (xmlns) this will not work.

2017/12/03

If you are using Visual Studio, try "clean solution" and then rebuild your project.

2010/07/13

The other answers wouldn't work for me. If you don't care about the version and you just want your app to run then right click on the reference and set 'specific version' to false...This worked for me. enter image description here

2019/02/27

Source: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/215026
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