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How do I parse command line arguments in Bash?


Question

Say, I have a script that gets called with this line:

./myscript -vfd ./foo/bar/someFile -o /fizz/someOtherFile

or this one:

./myscript -v -f -d -o /fizz/someOtherFile ./foo/bar/someFile 

What's the accepted way of parsing this such that in each case (or some combination of the two) $v, $f, and $d will all be set to true and $outFile will be equal to /fizz/someOtherFile?

2020/07/23
1
1974
7/23/2020 3:31:52 PM

Accepted Answer

Method #1: Using bash without getopt[s]

Two common ways to pass key-value-pair arguments are:

Bash Space-Separated (e.g., --option argument) (without getopt[s])

Usage demo-space-separated.sh -e conf -s /etc -l /usr/lib /etc/hosts

cat >/tmp/demo-space-separated.sh <<'EOF'
#!/bin/bash

POSITIONAL=()
while [[ $# -gt 0 ]]
do
key="$1"

case $key in
    -e|--extension)
    EXTENSION="$2"
    shift # past argument
    shift # past value
    ;;
    -s|--searchpath)
    SEARCHPATH="$2"
    shift # past argument
    shift # past value
    ;;
    -l|--lib)
    LIBPATH="$2"
    shift # past argument
    shift # past value
    ;;
    --default)
    DEFAULT=YES
    shift # past argument
    ;;
    *)    # unknown option
    POSITIONAL+=("$1") # save it in an array for later
    shift # past argument
    ;;
esac
done
set -- "${POSITIONAL[@]}" # restore positional parameters

echo "FILE EXTENSION  = ${EXTENSION}"
echo "SEARCH PATH     = ${SEARCHPATH}"
echo "LIBRARY PATH    = ${LIBPATH}"
echo "DEFAULT         = ${DEFAULT}"
echo "Number files in SEARCH PATH with EXTENSION:" $(ls -1 "${SEARCHPATH}"/*."${EXTENSION}" | wc -l)
if [[ -n $1 ]]; then
    echo "Last line of file specified as non-opt/last argument:"
    tail -1 "$1"
fi
EOF

chmod +x /tmp/demo-space-separated.sh

/tmp/demo-space-separated.sh -e conf -s /etc -l /usr/lib /etc/hosts

output from copy-pasting the block above:

FILE EXTENSION  = conf
SEARCH PATH     = /etc
LIBRARY PATH    = /usr/lib
DEFAULT         =
Number files in SEARCH PATH with EXTENSION: 14
Last line of file specified as non-opt/last argument:
#93.184.216.34    example.com

Bash Equals-Separated (e.g., --option=argument) (without getopt[s])

Usage demo-equals-separated.sh -e=conf -s=/etc -l=/usr/lib /etc/hosts

cat >/tmp/demo-equals-separated.sh <<'EOF'
#!/bin/bash

for i in "[email protected]"
do
case $i in
    -e=*|--extension=*)
    EXTENSION="${i#*=}"
    shift # past argument=value
    ;;
    -s=*|--searchpath=*)
    SEARCHPATH="${i#*=}"
    shift # past argument=value
    ;;
    -l=*|--lib=*)
    LIBPATH="${i#*=}"
    shift # past argument=value
    ;;
    --default)
    DEFAULT=YES
    shift # past argument with no value
    ;;
    *)
          # unknown option
    ;;
esac
done
echo "FILE EXTENSION  = ${EXTENSION}"
echo "SEARCH PATH     = ${SEARCHPATH}"
echo "LIBRARY PATH    = ${LIBPATH}"
echo "DEFAULT         = ${DEFAULT}"
echo "Number files in SEARCH PATH with EXTENSION:" $(ls -1 "${SEARCHPATH}"/*."${EXTENSION}" | wc -l)
if [[ -n $1 ]]; then
    echo "Last line of file specified as non-opt/last argument:"
    tail -1 $1
fi
EOF

chmod +x /tmp/demo-equals-separated.sh

/tmp/demo-equals-separated.sh -e=conf -s=/etc -l=/usr/lib /etc/hosts

output from copy-pasting the block above:

FILE EXTENSION  = conf
SEARCH PATH     = /etc
LIBRARY PATH    = /usr/lib
DEFAULT         =
Number files in SEARCH PATH with EXTENSION: 14
Last line of file specified as non-opt/last argument:
#93.184.216.34    example.com

To better understand ${i#*=} search for "Substring Removal" in this guide. It is functionally equivalent to `sed 's/[^=]*=//' <<< "$i"` which calls a needless subprocess or `echo "$i" | sed 's/[^=]*=//'` which calls two needless subprocesses.

Method #2: Using bash with getopt[s]

from: http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/035#getopts

getopt(1) limitations (older, relatively-recent getopt versions):

  • can't handle arguments that are empty strings
  • can't handle arguments with embedded whitespace

More recent getopt versions don't have these limitations.

Additionally, the POSIX shell (and others) offer getopts which doesn't have these limitations. I've included a simplistic getopts example.

Usage demo-getopts.sh -vf /etc/hosts foo bar

cat >/tmp/demo-getopts.sh <<'EOF'
#!/bin/sh

# A POSIX variable
OPTIND=1         # Reset in case getopts has been used previously in the shell.

# Initialize our own variables:
output_file=""
verbose=0

while getopts "h?vf:" opt; do
    case "$opt" in
    h|\?)
        show_help
        exit 0
        ;;
    v)  verbose=1
        ;;
    f)  output_file=$OPTARG
        ;;
    esac
done

shift $((OPTIND-1))

[ "${1:-}" = "--" ] && shift

echo "verbose=$verbose, output_file='$output_file', Leftovers: [email protected]"
EOF

chmod +x /tmp/demo-getopts.sh

/tmp/demo-getopts.sh -vf /etc/hosts foo bar

output from copy-pasting the block above:

verbose=1, output_file='/etc/hosts', Leftovers: foo bar

The advantages of getopts are:

  1. It's more portable, and will work in other shells like dash.
  2. It can handle multiple single options like -vf filename in the typical Unix way, automatically.

The disadvantage of getopts is that it can only handle short options (-h, not --help) without additional code.

There is a getopts tutorial which explains what all of the syntax and variables mean. In bash, there is also help getopts, which might be informative.

2020/05/05
2762
5/5/2020 11:53:43 AM

No answer mentions enhanced getopt. And the top-voted answer is misleading: It either ignores -⁠vfd style short options (requested by the OP) or options after positional arguments (also requested by the OP); and it ignores parsing-errors. Instead:

  • Use enhanced getopt from util-linux or formerly GNU glibc.1
  • It works with getopt_long() the C function of GNU glibc.
  • Has all useful distinguishing features (the others don’t have them):
    • handles spaces, quoting characters and even binary in arguments2 (non-enhanced getopt can’t do this)
    • it can handle options at the end: script.sh -o outFile file1 file2 -v (getopts doesn’t do this)
    • allows =-style long options: script.sh --outfile=fileOut --infile fileIn (allowing both is lengthy if self parsing)
    • allows combined short options, e.g. -vfd (real work if self parsing)
    • allows touching option-arguments, e.g. -oOutfile or -vfdoOutfile
  • Is so old already3 that no GNU system is missing this (e.g. any Linux has it).
  • You can test for its existence with: getopt --test → return value 4.
  • Other getopt or shell-builtin getopts are of limited use.

The following calls

myscript -vfd ./foo/bar/someFile -o /fizz/someOtherFile
myscript -v -f -d -o/fizz/someOtherFile -- ./foo/bar/someFile
myscript --verbose --force --debug ./foo/bar/someFile -o/fizz/someOtherFile
myscript --output=/fizz/someOtherFile ./foo/bar/someFile -vfd
myscript ./foo/bar/someFile -df -v --output /fizz/someOtherFile

all return

verbose: y, force: y, debug: y, in: ./foo/bar/someFile, out: /fizz/someOtherFile

with the following myscript

#!/bin/bash
# saner programming env: these switches turn some bugs into errors
set -o errexit -o pipefail -o noclobber -o nounset

# -allow a command to fail with !’s side effect on errexit
# -use return value from ${PIPESTATUS[0]}, because ! hosed $?
! getopt --test > /dev/null 
if [[ ${PIPESTATUS[0]} -ne 4 ]]; then
    echo 'I’m sorry, `getopt --test` failed in this environment.'
    exit 1
fi

OPTIONS=dfo:v
LONGOPTS=debug,force,output:,verbose

# -regarding ! and PIPESTATUS see above
# -temporarily store output to be able to check for errors
# -activate quoting/enhanced mode (e.g. by writing out “--options”)
# -pass arguments only via   -- "[email protected]"   to separate them correctly
! PARSED=$(getopt --options=$OPTIONS --longoptions=$LONGOPTS --name "$0" -- "[email protected]")
if [[ ${PIPESTATUS[0]} -ne 0 ]]; then
    # e.g. return value is 1
    #  then getopt has complained about wrong arguments to stdout
    exit 2
fi
# read getopt’s output this way to handle the quoting right:
eval set -- "$PARSED"

d=n f=n v=n outFile=-
# now enjoy the options in order and nicely split until we see --
while true; do
    case "$1" in
        -d|--debug)
            d=y
            shift
            ;;
        -f|--force)
            f=y
            shift
            ;;
        -v|--verbose)
            v=y
            shift
            ;;
        -o|--output)
            outFile="$2"
            shift 2
            ;;
        --)
            shift
            break
            ;;
        *)
            echo "Programming error"
            exit 3
            ;;
    esac
done

# handle non-option arguments
if [[ $# -ne 1 ]]; then
    echo "$0: A single input file is required."
    exit 4
fi

echo "verbose: $v, force: $f, debug: $d, in: $1, out: $outFile"

1 enhanced getopt is available on most “bash-systems”, including Cygwin; on OS X try brew install gnu-getopt or sudo port install getopt
2 the POSIX exec() conventions have no reliable way to pass binary NULL in command line arguments; those bytes prematurely end the argument
3 first version released in 1997 or before (I only tracked it back to 1997)

2019/05/15

More succinct way

script.sh

#!/bin/bash

while [[ "$#" -gt 0 ]]; do
    case $1 in
        -d|--deploy) deploy="$2"; shift ;;
        -u|--uglify) uglify=1 ;;
        *) echo "Unknown parameter passed: $1"; exit 1 ;;
    esac
    shift
done

echo "Should deploy? $deploy"
echo "Should uglify? $uglify"

Usage:

./script.sh -d dev -u

# OR:

./script.sh --deploy dev --uglify
2020/05/01

from : digitalpeer.com with minor modifications

Usage myscript.sh -p=my_prefix -s=dirname -l=libname

#!/bin/bash
for i in "[email protected]"
do
case $i in
    -p=*|--prefix=*)
    PREFIX="${i#*=}"

    ;;
    -s=*|--searchpath=*)
    SEARCHPATH="${i#*=}"
    ;;
    -l=*|--lib=*)
    DIR="${i#*=}"
    ;;
    --default)
    DEFAULT=YES
    ;;
    *)
            # unknown option
    ;;
esac
done
echo PREFIX = ${PREFIX}
echo SEARCH PATH = ${SEARCHPATH}
echo DIRS = ${DIR}
echo DEFAULT = ${DEFAULT}

To better understand ${i#*=} search for "Substring Removal" in this guide. It is functionally equivalent to `sed 's/[^=]*=//' <<< "$i"` which calls a needless subprocess or `echo "$i" | sed 's/[^=]*=//'` which calls two needless subprocesses.

2019/02/10

getopt()/getopts() is a good option. Stolen from here:

The simple use of "getopt" is shown in this mini-script:

#!/bin/bash
echo "Before getopt"
for i
do
  echo $i
done
args=`getopt abc:d $*`
set -- $args
echo "After getopt"
for i
do
  echo "-->$i"
done

What we have said is that any of -a, -b, -c or -d will be allowed, but that -c is followed by an argument (the "c:" says that).

If we call this "g" and try it out:

bash-2.05a$ ./g -abc foo
Before getopt
-abc
foo
After getopt
-->-a
-->-b
-->-c
-->foo
-->--

We start with two arguments, and "getopt" breaks apart the options and puts each in its own argument. It also added "--".

2008/10/10

At the risk of adding another example to ignore, here's my scheme.

  • handles -n arg and --name=arg
  • allows arguments at the end
  • shows sane errors if anything is misspelled
  • compatible, doesn't use bashisms
  • readable, doesn't require maintaining state in a loop

Hope it's useful to someone.

while [ "$#" -gt 0 ]; do
  case "$1" in
    -n) name="$2"; shift 2;;
    -p) pidfile="$2"; shift 2;;
    -l) logfile="$2"; shift 2;;

    --name=*) name="${1#*=}"; shift 1;;
    --pidfile=*) pidfile="${1#*=}"; shift 1;;
    --logfile=*) logfile="${1#*=}"; shift 1;;
    --name|--pidfile|--logfile) echo "$1 requires an argument" >&2; exit 1;;

    -*) echo "unknown option: $1" >&2; exit 1;;
    *) handle_argument "$1"; shift 1;;
  esac
done
2015/07/21

Source: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/192249
Licensed under: CC-BY-SA with attribution
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Email: [email protected]