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Question

Is it somehow possible to automatically have a link to GitHub issue number in the git commit message?

2016/04/03
1
756
4/3/2016 12:01:04 AM

Accepted Answer

Just include #xxx in your commit message to reference an issue without closing it.

With new GitHub issues 2.0 you can use these synonyms to reference an issue and close it (in your commit message):

  • fix #xxx
  • fixes #xxx
  • fixed #xxx
  • close #xxx
  • closes #xxx
  • closed #xxx
  • resolve #xxx
  • resolves #xxx
  • resolved #xxx

You can also substitute #xxx with gh-xxx.

Referencing and closing issues across repos also works:

fixes user/repo#xxx

Check out the documentation available in their Help section.

2019/07/03
982
7/3/2019 4:27:40 AM

If you want to link to a GitHub issue and close the issue, you can provide the following lines in your Git commit message:

Closes #1.
Closes GH-1.
Closes gh-1.

(Any of the three will work.) Note that this will link to the issue and also close it. You can find out more in this blog post (start watching the embedded video at about 1:40).

I'm not sure if a similar syntax will simply link to an issue without closing it.

2019/07/02

You can also cross reference repos:

githubuser/repository#xxx

xxx being the issue number

2012/10/10

github adds a reference to the commit if it contains #issuenbr (discovered this by chance).

2011/04/14

they have an nice write up about the new issues 2.0 on their blog https://github.blog/2011-04-09-issues-2-0-the-next-generation/

synonyms include

  • fixes #xxx
  • fixed #xxx
  • fix #xxx
  • closes #xxx
  • close #xxx
  • closed #xxx

using any of the keywords in a commit message will make your commit either mentioned or close an issue.

2019/07/02

In order to link the issue number to your commit message, you should add: #issue_number in your git commit message.

Example Commit Message from Udacity Git Commit Message Style Guide

feat: Summarize changes in around 50 characters or less

More detailed explanatory text, if necessary. Wrap it to about 72
characters or so. In some contexts, the first line is treated as the
subject of the commit and the rest of the text as the body. The
blank line separating the summary from the body is critical (unless
you omit the body entirely); various tools like `log`, `shortlog`
and `rebase` can get confused if you run the two together.

Explain the problem that this commit is solving. Focus on why you
are making this change as opposed to how (the code explains that).
Are there side effects or other unintuitive consequenses of this
change? Here's the place to explain them.

Further paragraphs come after blank lines.

 - Bullet points are okay, too

 - Typically a hyphen or asterisk is used for the bullet, preceded
   by a single space, with blank lines in between, but conventions
   vary here

If you use an issue tracker, put references to them at the bottom,
like this:

Resolves: #123
See also: #456, #789

You can also reference the repositories:

githubuser/repository#issue_number

Source: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/1687262
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