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Add one row to pandas DataFrame


Question

I understand that pandas is designed to load fully populated DataFrame but I need to create an empty DataFrame then add rows, one by one. What is the best way to do this ?

I successfully created an empty DataFrame with :

res = DataFrame(columns=('lib', 'qty1', 'qty2'))

Then I can add a new row and fill a field with :

res = res.set_value(len(res), 'qty1', 10.0)

It works but seems very odd :-/ (it fails for adding string value)

How can I add a new row to my DataFrame (with different columns type) ?

2019/01/03
1
933
1/3/2019 3:25:19 PM

Accepted Answer

You can use df.loc[i], where the row with index i will be what you specify it to be in the dataframe.

>>> import pandas as pd
>>> from numpy.random import randint

>>> df = pd.DataFrame(columns=['lib', 'qty1', 'qty2'])
>>> for i in range(5):
>>>     df.loc[i] = ['name' + str(i)] + list(randint(10, size=2))

>>> df
     lib qty1 qty2
0  name0    3    3
1  name1    2    4
2  name2    2    8
3  name3    2    1
4  name4    9    6
2020/06/07
621
6/7/2020 12:06:45 AM


You could use pandas.concat() or DataFrame.append(). For details and examples, see Merge, join, and concatenate.

2012/10/17

It's been a long time, but I faced the same problem too. And found here a lot of interesting answers. So I was confused what method to use.

In the case of adding a lot of rows to dataframe I interested in speed performance. So I tried 4 most popular methods and checked their speed.

UPDATED IN 2019 using new versions of packages. Also updated after @FooBar comment

SPEED PERFORMANCE

  1. Using .append (NPE's answer)
  2. Using .loc (fred's answer)
  3. Using .loc with preallocating (FooBar's answer)
  4. Using dict and create DataFrame in the end (ShikharDua's answer)

Results (in secs):

|------------|-------------|-------------|-------------|
|  Approach  |  1000 rows  |  5000 rows  | 10 000 rows |
|------------|-------------|-------------|-------------|
| .append    |    0.69     |    3.39     |    6.78     |
|------------|-------------|-------------|-------------|
| .loc w/o   |    0.74     |    3.90     |    8.35     |
| prealloc   |             |             |             |
|------------|-------------|-------------|-------------|
| .loc with  |    0.24     |    2.58     |    8.70     |
| prealloc   |             |             |             |
|------------|-------------|-------------|-------------|
|  dict      |    0.012    |   0.046     |   0.084     |
|------------|-------------|-------------|-------------|

Also thanks to @krassowski for useful comment - I updated the code.

So I use addition through the dictionary for myself.


Code:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
import time

del df1, df2, df3, df4
numOfRows = 1000
# append
startTime = time.perf_counter()
df1 = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randint(100, size=(5,5)), columns=['A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E'])
for i in range( 1,numOfRows-4):
    df1 = df1.append( dict( (a,np.random.randint(100)) for a in ['A','B','C','D','E']), ignore_index=True)
print('Elapsed time: {:6.3f} seconds for {:d} rows'.format(time.perf_counter() - startTime, numOfRows))
print(df1.shape)

# .loc w/o prealloc
startTime = time.perf_counter()
df2 = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randint(100, size=(5,5)), columns=['A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E'])
for i in range( 1,numOfRows):
    df2.loc[i]  = np.random.randint(100, size=(1,5))[0]
print('Elapsed time: {:6.3f} seconds for {:d} rows'.format(time.perf_counter() - startTime, numOfRows))
print(df2.shape)

# .loc with prealloc
df3 = pd.DataFrame(index=np.arange(0, numOfRows), columns=['A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E'] )
startTime = time.perf_counter()
for i in range( 1,numOfRows):
    df3.loc[i]  = np.random.randint(100, size=(1,5))[0]
print('Elapsed time: {:6.3f} seconds for {:d} rows'.format(time.perf_counter() - startTime, numOfRows))
print(df3.shape)

# dict
startTime = time.perf_counter()
row_list = []
for i in range (0,5):
    row_list.append(dict( (a,np.random.randint(100)) for a in ['A','B','C','D','E']))
for i in range( 1,numOfRows-4):
    dict1 = dict( (a,np.random.randint(100)) for a in ['A','B','C','D','E'])
    row_list.append(dict1)

df4 = pd.DataFrame(row_list, columns=['A','B','C','D','E'])
print('Elapsed time: {:6.3f} seconds for {:d} rows'.format(time.perf_counter() - startTime, numOfRows))
print(df4.shape)

P.S. I believe, my realization isn't perfect, and maybe there is some optimization.

2019/08/19

If you know the number of entries ex ante, you should preallocate the space by also providing the index (taking the data example from a different answer):

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
# we know we're gonna have 5 rows of data
numberOfRows = 5
# create dataframe
df = pd.DataFrame(index=np.arange(0, numberOfRows), columns=('lib', 'qty1', 'qty2') )

# now fill it up row by row
for x in np.arange(0, numberOfRows):
    #loc or iloc both work here since the index is natural numbers
    df.loc[x] = [np.random.randint(-1,1) for n in range(3)]
In[23]: df
Out[23]: 
   lib  qty1  qty2
0   -1    -1    -1
1    0     0     0
2   -1     0    -1
3    0    -1     0
4   -1     0     0

Speed comparison

In[30]: %timeit tryThis() # function wrapper for this answer
In[31]: %timeit tryOther() # function wrapper without index (see, for example, @fred)
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.23 ms per loop
100 loops, best of 3: 2.31 ms per loop

And - as from the comments - with a size of 6000, the speed difference becomes even larger:

Increasing the size of the array (12) and the number of rows (500) makes the speed difference more striking: 313ms vs 2.29s

2015/04/02

mycolumns = ['A', 'B']
df = pd.DataFrame(columns=mycolumns)
rows = [[1,2],[3,4],[5,6]]
for row in rows:
    df.loc[len(df)] = row
2015/06/24

For efficient appending see How to add an extra row to a pandas dataframe and Setting With Enlargement.

Add rows through loc/ix on non existing key index data. e.g. :

In [1]: se = pd.Series([1,2,3])

In [2]: se
Out[2]: 
0    1
1    2
2    3
dtype: int64

In [3]: se[5] = 5.

In [4]: se
Out[4]: 
0    1.0
1    2.0
2    3.0
5    5.0
dtype: float64

Or:

In [1]: dfi = pd.DataFrame(np.arange(6).reshape(3,2),
   .....:                 columns=['A','B'])
   .....: 

In [2]: dfi
Out[2]: 
   A  B
0  0  1
1  2  3
2  4  5

In [3]: dfi.loc[:,'C'] = dfi.loc[:,'A']

In [4]: dfi
Out[4]: 
   A  B  C
0  0  1  0
1  2  3  2
2  4  5  4
In [5]: dfi.loc[3] = 5

In [6]: dfi
Out[6]: 
   A  B  C
0  0  1  0
1  2  3  2
2  4  5  4
3  5  5  5
2017/05/23